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DMR V8 Flatty Pedals

DMR V8 Flatty Pedals click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Black  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Electric Blue COMING SOON click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Ti Grey Metallic  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Deep Blue Metallic  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Infra Red  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Fools Gold  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Highlighter Orange  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  White  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Polished Silver  click to zoom image
DMR V8 Flatty Pedals  Lemon Lime  click to zoom image
  
Pricing
OUR PRICE £37.99










Options Electric Red COMING SOON - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS

Black In Stock
Electric Blue COMING SOON - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Ti Grey Metallic - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Deep Blue Metallic - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS

Infra Red In Stock
Fools Gold - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Highlighter Orange - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
White - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Polished Silver - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Lemon Lime - USUALLY AVAILABLE WITHIN 3-10 DAYS
Description
New and updated DMR V8 Mk.2 pedal design. Sharing the concave shape and durability that the iconic DMR V8 pedals became famous for, the new version has a larger platform area and serviceable Dual DU bushing system.

The new DMR V8 pins can be tuned for preferred grip and feel. Available in a range of colours.

- Large platform area
- Ultra-low profile
- Weight: 480g (pair)
- Serviceable dual DU bush system
- 10 tuneable pins per side
- Heavy duty 4140 Cro-Mo steel axles
- Tough die cast aluminium body


DMR V8 pedals review, Singletrack Magazine, September 2017:
"The original DMR V8s, now referred to as the DMR V8 Classic, have been around for longer than some of us have been mountain biking. They are indeed a classic design, but nowadays with so much choice, and so many sleek pedals around for the choosing, perhaps that design is looking a little long in the tooth.

Enter the DMR V8 V2, a revision for 2017, more on trend and more in line with its current V12 and Vault pedals. It has a thinner profile at 23mm, and a bigger platform of 98 x 93mm. It also drops some weight compared to the old version (480g for the V2 vs. 528g for the Classic), while retaining DMR's signature bowl shape and upgrading a few features. The front edge of the die-cast aluminium body is slightly wider than the back, and the ten pins per side are all identical grub screws.

The loose ball bearings of the original V8 are gone, replaced with a pair of top hat bushings in each pedal. Internally this makes for a nice and simple pedal, though, sooner or later, grit will get in and start to eat the plastic, eventually creating play. That said, our test pair are still going strong despite being passed on to someone for regular use, and replacement bushings are hardly expensive at £1.29 for a complete set. These are going to be cheap and simple to service, and unlike DMR's other pedals they don't need any special tools to remove or insert bushings.

They may not be the lightest pedals, but the bulk of the bodies grants them quite a bit of toughness, as became evident as the test went on. Compared to most budget flats they also have a nice amount of curvature and ramping in the body shape, helping to deflect impacts.

The concavity is good, though not as deep as that you'd find on a pair of (more expensive) DMR Vaults. Combined with that, the pins these V8 V2s arrived with were just a little bit short for my liking. Most of the time that wasn't a bother, but it became evident on the roughest descents where I discovered my shoes would move around just a little without me wanting them to. A second opinion from a friend, though, was that they were just right.

DMR does sell kits of 'Terror Pins', which are basically longer M4 grub screws than the stock pins. After swapping these in on the front and back holes of the V8s, but leaving the shorter pins in closer to the axles, I suddenly found them a much better pedal. Like any well-designed bike component, I didn't have to think about them or do any foot adjustments mid-descent. They did their job with a good amount of grip. Descending, jumping, braking, climbing, muscling the bike up rocky steps, my feet stayed put throughout.

Good bike bits help you get into flow states while you're riding, bad ones kick you out of them. The V8 V2s definitely belong in the former category.

Overall
If you're the kind of person who craves car park points, these probably aren't for you - but what budget pedals would be? If you're looking for something functional on a budget though, these are well worth a look. They're a simple pedal, but a reliable, good and tough one. At the price, they're a bargain."

Grouptest Winner Of Best Budget Pedals
As with any product, specification is subject to change without prior notification. You are advised to confirm current specification before buying.
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